New Dacia Duster review: the long-term test

Published:04 November 2019

New Dacia Duster review: the long-term test
  • At a glance
  • 3 out of 5
  • 3 out of 5
  • 4 out of 5
  • 4 out of 5
  • 4 out of 5

By CAR's road test team

Our reviewers: fresh perspectives for inquisitive minds

By CAR's road test team

Our reviewers: fresh perspectives for inquisitive minds

► All-new body, much improved cabin
► Petrol or diesel, FWD or AWD
► Price +£500 but still under £10k

We're currently running a Dacia Duster Comfort on the CAR long-termer fleet. If you want to read about our experience with that, click here, or keep reading for our first drive of the new Duster SUV. 

Dacia Duster: first drive

The Dacia Duster has been a huge hit since the Renault-owned Romanian brand came to Britain five years ago. Using a variety of old Renault engines and underpinnings and a bespoke body and interior, it was Britain’s cheapest SUV. People loved its simplicity, its functionality and its ruggedness. They also loved its price; more than half of Dacia’s UK customers have bought a new Dacia after years of owning used cars.

The Mk2, on sale in the UK now after several months of frantic European showroom activity in left-hand-drive form, is again Britain’s cheapest SUV – the entry-level version has gone up by £500, but still limbos under the £10,000 barrier.

With the Mk2, Dacia has aimed to address criticisms from customers by improving the quality and equipment level, without losing the price advantage. And the UK team have done a lot of behind-the-scenes work to come up with attractive PCP offers, which is increasingly the way people want to buy Dacias.

What’s new? Almost everything

The exterior design changes look like a thorough facelift rather than a clean-sheet design, but in fact every single panel is different. The dimensions are the same, as the chassis hasn’t changed much, but from the deeper grille and more curvaceous bonnet, via the beefier roof bars and shallower windows, to the smart rear lights, it’s new.

Inside, the changes are even more substantial. The seats are more comfortable, more supportive and more adjustable. There are more air vents, a better infotainment system, more stowage cubbies and various safety upgrades. 

What engines can I get?

At the moment, you have an uninspiring choice of engines: a turbocharged petrol,  naturally aspirated petrol four (the SCe 115 that we drove) and a turbodiesel (Blue dCi 115). 

The petrol is available with front- or four-wheel drive, while the diesel is front-drive-only for now, although all-wheel drive will become available.

There are four trim levels, named with a Ronseal clarity: Access, Essential, Comfort and Prestige. Access has next to nothing: black door handles, no radio, manual rear window winders, no air con. Comfort is probably the best balance; it adds £3k or so to the price, but it’s worth it for the sat nav, better upholstery, USB slot, trip computer and various other items of equipment that many a modern buyer would expect to be included.

Can a car cost less than £10k and drive well too?

We’ve not driven the entry-level Duster; our Comfort-spec petrol test car comes in at just over £13,000. But the extra cost is all about accessories, not the fundamentals. And those fundamentals are pretty good.

If you’ve driven a decent French family car in the last 10 years, you know more or less what the Duster feels like: comfy ride, light steering, a degree of slackness engineered in to the controls, and an easygoing vibe that values passengers at least as much as the driver.

What’s improved most noticeably is the cabin ambience, which has benefitted hugely from additional soundproofing. The extra central vent helps all five occupants stay comfortable. The seats are much better. The predominant cabin material is stll plastic, but it’s now generally nicer plastic, and the shape of the dash is much more pleasing to the eye.

It’s still a simple, basic car, but the fundamentals are sound: big boot, economical engines, no nonsense.

And off road?

We had a 20-minute off-road expedition (in a different Duster, a German-spec diesel 4x4) and we were wowed by its willingness and capability through ruts, up steep ascents and down awkwardly angled slopes. The hill descent control and switchable 4x4 system (actually best left in auto mode, to decide for itself which wheels to drive) do a great job of keeping you trundling along. With all-wheel drive you get a six rather than five-speed gearbox, with a lower first gear to help with off-road work.

Underpinning it all is the Duster’s impressively light kerbweight – just 1179kg – which doesn’t put too much strain on the engine, transmission or suspension.

All-wheel-drive Dusters have independent rear suspension, which eats slightly into the boot space but gives the necessary rear wheel movement.

Some Dusters are bought as farm vehicles, and a few for leisure off-roading. But even if you never intentionally go off road, it’s good to know that it can cope with broken surfaces. 

By Colin Overland



New Dacia Duster long-term test: the people's champion

The Oxford English Dictionary describes juxtaposition as ‘the fact of two things being seen or placed close together with contrasting effect’, but I think a picture of my new Dacia Duster long-term test car and Ben Miller’s BMW 8-M850i side by side would do just fine. That’s the scene in the car park right now.

The brawny V8 BMW is decimating tyres and fuel – and dominating the Instagram accounts and attention of pretty much everyone I know – but over in the real world, it’s the Dacia Duster that’s the true people’s champion.

Starting from just £9995, it’s crushingly good value when compared with the competition. In fact, it’s so affordable that it has to fight in a different weight category; Dacia says its main rivals come from the used market, and from the C-segment below – no other new car can directly compete when it comes to value.

Take one look at the new Duster and it becomes apparent that it’s on paper that the Dacia  presents its best argument for ownership. It’s not exactly a looker, especially in this rather ’70s-style orange metallic paint (a £495 extra), though that’s only my subjective opinion, and on spreadsheets and spec lists, Dacia’s flagship model is certainly eye-catching.

People are buying it too; 45% of all models Dacia sells are Dusters, and UK sales of 10,926 for the first quarter of this year represent a whopping 52% uplift on the same period last year. In the sales charts at least, my Duster has that BMW 8-series beat. 

We’re running a £15,000 Comfort TCe; same spacious interior and five seats as the entry-level model, but the extra £5k goes a very long way. In Dacia-speak, Comfort means Apple CarPlay, Android Auto and quite a few other toys. Dacia says most Duster-buyers feel the same; the Comfort hogs 48% of the trim split, with the Essential below accounting for 17%, and the Prestige above making up 31% above. There’s now a flagship Techroad, but with a starting price of around £16k, it’s unlikely to move the needle. 

So, does it feel like a £15,000 car? In short, yes, it does. To be fair, Dacia has tried to make the Duster look better than the first-generation model, but even when compared to its Renault siblings, design isn’t its strong suit. It’s a similar story inside, too – but we’ll get to that another time. Still, the Duster isn’t a car you’re supposed to be seduced by – it get you with maths.

I’ll be spending the next six months with the new Duster, and in that time you’ll get a forensic analysis of one the nation’s most popular family cars.

By Curtis Moldrich


New Dacia Duster long-term test: month two

The Dacia Duster might not be the best looking car on the outside, and things get worse the moment you climb aboard. Those more optimistic than me would call the grey plastic expanse ‘honest’ or ‘utilitarian’; it makes no attempt to hide its cost-saving ethos.

Give it a knock and it certainly feels solid – I have no doubt the Duster will take anything I throw at it – but it’s durable in the same way as plastic outdoor furniture.

The doors close with a thunk, the air vents look like shutters on a nuclear bunker, and the gearstick is comically large. Why Dacia felt the need to make the gearknob the size of a Coke can I don’t know.

Another oddity is the electric mirror controls, which sit within their own square recess for some reason. I know this car achieves its bargain price by raiding Renault’s parts bin, but do I have to be reminded about it at every turn? Even the ignition switch looks like an afterthought.

There’s nothing premium about the Duster’s interior, but I’m sure it’d make a robust workhorse for a small family. It gives you generous cabin room, and the grey vastness contains 28.6 litres of storage space, too. 

Cavernous doorbins can take a large drinks bottle each, there’s lots of space for multiple things in the transmission tunnel, and there’s even a drawer under the passenger’s seat. If you’ve got a family that doesn’t travel light, or you’re just a single hoarder, this car will fit your needs perfectly.

Sadly, this functionality is wasted on me: all my Dacia Duster truly has to carry is an owner’s manual, fuel fill-up logbook and pen. And me, sometimes.

So, what to think of the Duster’s interior? If you see a car as something you’ll need and want to spend a lot of time in, it’s not great. But think of it as a machine to get you from A to B, and it’s thoughtful and well-executed.

Logbook

Price £14,400 (£15,045 as tested)
Performance 1333cc turbo four-cyl, 128bhp, 11.1sec 0-62mph, 118mph
Efficiency 39.2-41.5mpg (official), 37.6mpg (tested), 136g/km CO2
Energy cost 16p per mile
Miles this month 569
Total miles 1975


Month 3 living with a Dacia Duster: laughing at me, not with me

Duster boot

Ever get the feeling there’s a joke everyone’s in on but you? The entire CAR team has lauded my Duster’s bike-swallowing boot space, back-to-basics approach and honest appeal. Entire, that is, except for me.

It’s not that I only like premium, expensive cars. A good Ford Fiesta, for example, can be very rewarding to drive. Push the Duster, however, and you get nothing. It’s glacial.

What’s on offer is a different sort of entertainment. Use the Duster’s super-light steering to whip it into corners for a mixture of fear and hilarity, and pin the gas to conjure some speed from its 128bhp. 

It’s pretty hopeless, and ultimately pointless, trying to make it behave like other cars. But that’s part of the appeal. Am I finally getting it?

Logbook

Price £14,400 (£15,045 as tested)
Performance 1333cc turbo four-cyl, 128bhp, 11.1sec 0-62mph, 118mph
Efficiency 39.2-41.5mpg (official), 37.1mpg (tested), 136g/km CO2
Energy cost 16.1p per mile
Miles this month 432
Total miles 2407


Month 4 living with a Dacia Duster: sitting comfortably?

Duster seats

The M25 is a ribbon of misery at the best of times, but combine it with seven-hour delays and it’s like a tenth tarmaced circle of hell.

Spending that much time in anything is a strain, but in the Duster, a few ergonomic annoyances build into full-on problems. I’m 6ft 3in, and the Duster forces me to push the seat all the way back – and even then it’s not far enough. My legs constantly rub on the steering wheel. Raising the wheel does me no favours either. 

But worst of all are the seats. After three or four hours, I find myself effectively breakdancing in the Duster’s cabin, to a soundtrack of podcasts, hoping to stumble on a position where my lower back vertebrae don’t feel fused together.

Logbook

Price £14,400 (£15,045 as tested)
Performance 1333cc turbo four-cyl, 128bhp, 11.1sec 0-62mph, 118mph
Efficiency 39.2-41.5mpg (official), 37.1mpg (tested), 136g/km CO2
Energy cost 16.1p per mile
Miles this month 286
Total miles 2693

Specs

Price when new: £13,195
On sale in the UK: Now
Engine: 1598cc 16v 4-cyl, 113bhp @ 5500rpm, 115lb ft @ 4000rpm
Transmission: 5-speed manual, front-wheel drive
Performance: 107mph, 11.9 0-62mph, 43.5mpg, 149 g/km CO2
Weight / material: 1179kg/steel
Dimensions (length/width/height in mm): 4341/2052/1693 in mm

Photo Gallery

  • New Dacia Duster review: the long-term test
  • New Dacia Duster review: the long-term test
  • New Dacia Duster review: the long-term test
  • We review the new Dacia Duster
  • We review the new Dacia Duster
  • New Dacia Duster review: the long-term test
  • New Dacia Duster review: the long-term test
  • We review the new Dacia Duster
  • New Dacia Duster review: the long-term test
  • New Dacia Duster review: the long-term test
  • New Dacia Duster review: the long-term test
  • New Dacia Duster review: the long-term test
  • We review the new Dacia Duster
  • New Dacia Duster review: the long-term test
  • New Dacia Duster review: the long-term test
  • New Dacia Duster review: the long-term test
  • New Dacia Duster review: the long-term test
  • New Dacia Duster review: the long-term test

By CAR's road test team

Our reviewers: fresh perspectives for inquisitive minds

Comments