Skoda Enyaq Coupe (2022) review: when less is more

Published:09 March 2022

The new 2022 Skoda Enyaq Coupe review
  • At a glance
  • 3 out of 5
  • 3 out of 5
  • 4 out of 5
  • 4 out of 5
  • 4 out of 5

By Keith Adams

Devout classic Citroen enthusiast, walking car encyclopedia, and long-time contributor to CAR

By Keith Adams

Devout classic Citroen enthusiast, walking car encyclopedia, and long-time contributor to CAR

► Coupe-SUV body adds appeal to the Enyaq
► Loses out on entry-level versions
► Hot vRS packs 296bhp and four-wheel drive

Out of all of the front-running large electric family cars out there, the regular SUV-bodied Skoda Enyaq is by far the most rational. It’s roomy, offers a plush and inviting interior, and is available with a big 82kWh battery pack and long range – it’s good. Very good, Better than its Volkswagen ID.4 cousin, in fact. But what it lacks is sexiness. 

That’s where the latest addition to Skoda’s growing ranks of EVs is hoping to add to the portfolio. The Skoda Enyaq Coupe iV gets a sleek new roof, a big glass panel in the roof and is topped by an all-new vRS version packing 296bhp and a twin-motor four-wheel drive system. As expected, much of the under-the-skin hardware is shared with the Enyaq SUV – and is none the worse for it. 

The UK market does without a small battery 62kWh entry-level model, and you won’t be seeing the mid-range 80X four-wheel drive model (that is SUV only), and there’s a healthy price premium for the new bodystyle. Skoda says the vast majority of Enyaq customers come via conquest sales – and it’s no stretch of the imagination to see potential Kia EV6, Tesla Model Y and Hyundai Ioniq 5 owners looking to add the Coupe to their shopping list, where they might have ignored the Enyaq SUV. 

Skoda Enyaq Coupe vRS (2022) Shoulder line and C-pillar

So how does it differ from the regular Enyaq?

The Coupe-SUV is the fastest-growing market sector of them all – and battery-powered examples really at at the height of the automotive zeitgeist right now. We can see why – drivers get that lovely high H-point that they’ve grown to love through regular SUV ownership, but with the sleek roofline and more aerodynamic styling (drag coefficient is 0.253), it looks a whole lot less bulky in the flesh. Imagine a Micro Machines Octavia and you’re there.

It’s definitely more visually appealing than the Enyaq SUV – with a stubby and purposeful look that goes someway to disguise its bulk. And no surprise here – it’s a better looking thing than Volkswagen’s interpretation, the new ID.5. 

Clever stuff, though, because so much of the original car is retained. The rear is the most changed aspect, and even then it retains the same rear lights. The most interesting part of the car, the C-pillar, is particularly sharp and shapely – sharing the same stretched Hoffmeister Kink used to great effect in the Octavia and Superb. Team that with the glass roof (the largest that Skoda has ever used) and dark alloys, and you’re left with a purposeful-looking car that car go toe-to-to with the Kia EV6 in the styling department.

Skoda engineers say that the Coupe’s sleeker body improved the Enyaq’s already impressive battery range between 10-15 miles in real world driving, although that’s not fully reflected in the WLTP figures. The vRS model delivers similar range and efficiency than the standard 80X  model. 

Skoda Enyaq Coupe vRS (2022) profile view

vRS, you say?

Yes, the Skoda Enyaq Coupe iV comes in vRS form. We’ll get to how it drives below, but needless to say, it looks the part, and you can understand why the company is resisting making an SUV version (for now), giving its latest model a unique halo version. 

There’s a more aggressive front end, and the same body coloured side mouldings, but under the skin is where you’ll find the main differences to the previous range-topping 80X. To all intents and purposes, it’s a Volkswagen ID.4 GTX given the Czech treatment, so you get the same 82kWh battery, twin motors, four-wheel drive and 296bhp. 

Performance is usefully upgraded over the standard Enyaq 80X thanks to an additional 40bhp – 0-62mph comes up in a more acceptable 6.5 seconds. But in a world populated by EV6s and Model Ys that can beat that by more than a second, it still reads rather unimpressively in such a performance-focused model.

What’s it like to drive?

We slid behind the wheel of both UK models – the iV 80 and vRS, and came away with a real sense of deja vu. As we said at the top, there’s not a great deal wrong with the Enyaq, and an awful lot to like – but if you want your thrills, you’re going to need to look elsewhere.

However, the iV 80 remains as solid, well-tempered and refined as ever – if you want to get somewhere unflustered, this really is your car. The ride quality is generally smooth and well-damped, although sharp imperfections can shudder through and destabilise its equilibrium. High-speed refinement is impressive, with low levels of wind and road noise, and you come away feeling that this is a very well resolved product.

Performance is adequate rather than exciting – acceleration is sturdy, with a 0-62mph time of 8.7 seconds, and effortless mid-range punch. There’s enough performance to see you past ambling traffic on single-carriageway roads, and joining a motorway is stress-free. But in today’s EV market, it’s adequate and hardly at the sharp end of the grid.

Handling is accurate and served up few vices, and despite its compliant ride, there’s not too much bodyroll to complain about. Threading it quickly down a B-road shows that it’s capable without serving up any meaningful feedback, while there’s no disguising its weight when it comes to deft changes in direction. Numb but capable sums it up.

The vRS adds straight-line performance, but in truth it still doesn’t feel electrifyingly quick in the way a good EV should. We’re okay with it not being that exciting as vRS models have traditionally been about quantity not tactile quality, but it’s hard not to come to conclusion that our test car’s lairy green paint writes cheques it can’t quite cash.

What’s it like inside?

Skoda Enyaq Coupe vRS (2022) interior

It’s a case of regular Enyaq with some added software updates. The interior’s welcoming blend of colour and trim choices remains intact, although the vRS model gets natty detailing and coloured stitching. This is a very strong aspect of the car, and it’s good to see that Skoda resisted changing it for the sake of it.

Interior room remains pretty much unchanged with decent headroom in the rear, and the boot is also as large as ever and easy to load with it. Capacity in 570 litres with the rear seats in the upright position.

The Infotainment’s been updated with improved navigation controls and what Skoda describes as a more  intuitive set of controls for the lane-assist system. Public charge points are better integrated into the nav (they needed to be), as well as the ability to accent over-the-air updates. Finally.

Otherwise it’s business as usual inside – which is all good news. Any other manufacturer would describe the Enyaq’s interior as premium, and rightly so, but with Audi in the group, Skoda fights shy of that. So, we’ll say it’s aspirational. And well ahead of the Volkswagen ID.4/ID.5.

Skoda Enyaq Coupe: verdict

We might have been a little hard on the Coupe’s dynamics, because overall we really like the Enyaq. As an EV to run for the long haul, it’s very capable and likeable, and overall comes across as being Volkswagen Group’s most convincing MEB model. However, those qualities apply equally to the SUV this car is based on.

The vRS is probably slightly less convincing than it could have been – but to deliver legendary performance it was always going to need a power output that starts with a four and not a two…

But you will end up doing the sums. The Enyaq Coupe comes at a premium over the SUV, and for your money, you’re getting more style and less practicality – yes, this is the eternal dilemma with Coupes, but one worth bearing in mind. Having said that, as we said at the top, this one might end up appearing on some very different shopping lists, in which case that’s a win-win for Skoda.

But is it a win-win for you? Based on our first drive, it looks like the Czechs have just about pulled it off. Those striking new looks really do set it apart in a way that’s unexpected. It really is suitably different enough to the Enyaq to get juices flowing – it does what it needs to in order to justify the higher price. Proof indeed that sex sells.

Skoda Enyaq Coupe vRS (2022) rear view

Specs

Price when new: £51,885
On sale in the UK: June 2022
Engine: Twin e-motor, 82kWh battery, 296bhp
Transmission: Single-speed automatic, rear-wheel drive
Performance: 6.5sec 0-62mph, 99mph (est), 332-mile range
Weight / material: TBC
Dimensions (length/width/height in mm): TBC

Other Models

Photo Gallery

  • Skoda Enyaq Coupe iV
  • Skoda Enyaq Coupe iV
  • Skoda Enyaq Coupe iV
  • Skoda Enyaq Coupe iV
  • Skoda Enyaq Coupe iV
  • Skoda Enyaq Coupe iV
  • Skoda Enyaq Coupe (2022) review: when less is more
  • Skoda Enyaq Coupe (2022) review: when less is more
  • Skoda Enyaq Coupe (2022) review: when less is more
  • Skoda Enyaq Coupe (2022) review: when less is more
  • Skoda Enyaq Coupe (2022) review: when less is more
  • Skoda Enyaq Coupe (2022) review: when less is more
  • Skoda Enyaq Coupe (2022) review: when less is more
  • Skoda Enyaq Coupe (2022) review: when less is more
  • Skoda Enyaq Coupe (2022) review: when less is more
  • Skoda Enyaq Coupe (2022) review: when less is more
  • Skoda Enyaq Coupe (2022) review: when less is more

By Keith Adams

Devout classic Citroen enthusiast, walking car encyclopedia, and long-time contributor to CAR

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