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Gallery: Maranello’s finest at new Ferrari film premiere

Published: 27 November 2017

► Screening of Ferrari: Race To Immortality
► Seven decades of Maranello cars on show
► From 125 F1 to 812 Superfast

Ferraris galore? Here’s a selection of Maranello’s finest from the Ferrari Owners Club at a special screening of Ferrari: Race To Immortality at car storage and rental firm Studio 434.

The film tells the story of Scuderia Ferrari’s darkest days in the mid to late 1950s, when Alfonso de Portago, Luigi Musso, Peter Collins, Eugenio Castellotti and the first Englishman to win the F1 title, Mike Hawthorn, lost their lives in the space of a few short years.

We’re a hardy bunch but the mix of archive racing footage and rarely seen home video, plus testimonies from those who raced against them and fell in love with these drivers, gave us lumps in our throats.

You can find out more about the film at racetoimmortality.com, but in the meantime, here are a few favourite Ferraris from the display...

Ferrari 812

Ferrari 812 Superfast

The new top-of-the-tree mainstream Ferrari, the 812 Superfast. If anything, its name undersells it – it’s the most powerful naturally aspirated production car engine ever made. The 6.5-litre V12 delivers 789bhp, which means a top speed of 221mph and a 0-60mph sprint of 2.9 seconds.

For many years this wasn’t officially labelled a Ferrari. Enzo wanted a sub-brand to take on Porsche, and called it Dino, after his late son. British dealers often sold it with Ferrari badges, and it’s now been widely accepted as one of the finest Ferraris ever made

Dino 246 GTS

For many years this wasn’t officially labelled a Ferrari. Enzo wanted a sub-brand to take on Porsche, and called it Dino, after his late son. British dealers often sold it with Ferrari badges, and it’s now been widely accepted as one of the finest Ferraris ever made. Over the past five years Dino values have risen spectacularly. It’s quick, too – it may have only 196bhp but it weighs just 1100kg.

Ferrari 458 Spider

Ferrari 458

The Spider was launched in 2011, two years after the tin-top debuted. Its top speed is 199mph, and you crack 60mph in around three seconds on the way. The exterior is claimed to produce 140kg of downforce at 120mph. It was the first mainstream Ferrari model to be offered with no manual gearbox option.

Ferrari Monoposto

Ferrari 125 F1-166 F2Monoposto Chassis 102

This stunning racing car was sold to Giovanni Bracco as a 125 F1-166F2 Monoposto with a 1500cc turbocharged engine. Ferrari resold the car to Giannino Marzotto in 1951, but this time it had a 2.5-litre 12-cylinder engine. Unlike the factory cars it had a De Dion rear axle, and was raced by Dorino Serafini at the Syracuse GP and Pau GP in 1951. It later spent time in South America before returning to Europe in the 1970s.

Ferrari 512TR

Ferrari 512 TR

This is the penultimate incarnation of the Testarossa and probably the sweet spot in the range. The run-out 512 M may drive better, but that looks like a deranged cartoon character. The 512 TR, built between 1991 and 1994, produced 428bhp thank to a 4.9-litre flat-12, which blasted owners from 0-60mph in around 4.5 seconds and on to 195mph.

Ferrari GTC4Lusso

Ferrari GTC4 Lusso

The GTC4Lusso replaced the FF in 2016, and is powered by a 6.3-litre V12 that produces 681bhp, with power transmitted to the road via a complex four-wheel-drive system. That means this three-door shooting brake – or ultimate hot hatchback – can hit 214mph and 60mph in 3.4 seconds.

Ferrari 430

Ferrari F430

The car that never really depreciated? The F430 may not look as stunning as the newer 458 Italia but the demand for mid-engined Ferraris has kept prices high. It packs 483bhp from its 4.3-litre V8, capable of taking the car from 0-60mph in 3.9 seconds and on to 196mph.

Ferrari Mondial

Ferrari Mondial T

The Ferrari Mondial was the Prancing Horse’s attempt to build an everyday GT to rival Porsche. With rear seats only really useable by small children or severely vertically challenged adults, it’s best to focus on the glorious V8 engine. This T version, dating from 1989, uses the 348 as its base. That means 300bhp.

Ferrari Mondial

Rhubarb and Custard sweets are a peculiar inspiration for a car interior, but the first owner of this Mondial T was clearly a fan...

Ferrari 348ts

Ferrari 348ts

The Ferrari 348 is probably your cheapest way into a mid-engined, two-seater Ferrari. For years it’s been cruelly labelled as ‘the crap one’, thanks to edgy on-the-limit handling. However, it’s now finding favour among those who don’t mind being kept on their toes.

Ferrari 330 GT

Ferrari 330 GT 2+2 Series II

The second-oldest Maranello machine to brave the winter roads, this elegant GT was introduced in 1965. It featured a five-speed gearbox, Koni adjustable dampers, disc brakes front and rear and optional air conditioning and power steering. Just 455 Series II cars were built between 1965 and 1967.

Ferrari 330

Ferrari 330 GT 2+2 Series II (2)

Now they’re proper exhausts – all the better for hearing the 4.0-lite Colombo V12 engine sing. The name – 330 – refers to the approximate displacement of each cylinder.

And that’s a proper interior – more wood and leather than a British politician’s office.

Ferrari 330 GT 2+2 Series II (3)

And that’s a proper interior – more wood and leather than a British politician’s office.

Ferrari 599

Ferrari 599

The Ferrari 599 GTB Fiorano replaced the 575M Maranello in 2006, and uses a variant of the V12 that powered the Enzo supercar. The 6.0-litre pushes out 612bhp, which means you’ll kiss goodbye to 60mph in around three seconds and say hello to 205mph all out. This is the last V12 Ferrari available with a manual, though most people chose the F1 paddle shift transmission. It’s believed just 30 manual 599s exist.

Ferrari California

Ferrari California

The Ferrari California debuted in 2008 and received a fairly mixed reaction - its looks didn’t win everyone over. There’s no ignoring the 453bhp V8, which propels the California to 60mph in around four seconds. That’s the same as the much lighter F430, with which the California shares its engine. It’s immortalised in Ridley Scott’s film The Counselor; you’ll never look at a Ferrari California – or Cameron Diaz – in quite the same way.

Ferrari 328

Ferrari 328 GTB

The Ferrari 328 was the follow up to the hugely successful 308. It used a variant of the same ‘Dino’ V8 used in the 308, but bored to 3.2-litres. You’ll hit 60mph around 5.5 seconds and hit the limiter at 166mph.

Ferrari 612 Scaglietti

Ferrari 612 Scaglietti

The last of the truly elegant four-seater Ferraris? The 612 was deemed a little ugly and somewhat obese upon its 2004 launch, not helped by its headlamps, which brought to mind former England manager Sven Goran-Eriksson’s glasses. The design has matured well, however. This 532bhp V12 machine has a top speed of 199mph and can hit 60mph in 4.2 seconds. It’s named after Sergio Scaglietti, whose coachbuilding company built racing Ferraris in the 1950s. Today the firm is owned by Ferrari.

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