Mercedes-AMG SL roadster (2022) review: California dreamin’

Published:11 January 2022

Mercedes-AMG SL roadster (2022) review: California dreamin’
  • At a glance
  • 4 out of 5
  • 4 out of 5
  • 3 out of 5
  • 4 out of 5
  • 4 out of 5

By Georg Kacher

European editor, secrets uncoverer, futurist, first man behind any wheel

By Georg Kacher

European editor, secrets uncoverer, futurist, first man behind any wheel

► Driving the new Mercedes-AMG SL
► Sports car or grand tourer?
► We drive it in Southern California

Everyone loves the new SL at first sight. But, this time, the endless onlookers during our time in California with the new one have fallen for a car that moves a couple of notches deeper into sports-car territory than recent SLs.

Why? Because the new SL is developed by AMG, not by Mercedes-Benz. That’s a big deal. An even bigger deal is that Jochen Hermann, AMG’s chief technical officer, describes this new SL as a much more dynamic proposal – a car that can, for the first time, challenge the Porsche 911. Brave words.

So, how has Mercedes-AMG done that?

Well, the R232-generation SL introduces an advanced multi-material architecture which is stiffer and significantly lighter even though the car is 180kg heavier. Why? Because it comes as standard with all-wheel drive, active anti-roll bars, rear-wheel steering and a fancy five-link front suspension. The SL55 test car’s carbonfibre brakes and 21-inch wheels cost extra.

mercedes sl front static

The Merc’s rounded rear end certainly pays subtle homage to the 911, and the performance is on a similar level. Closing the soft-top is a two-touch affair that’s over and done within 15 seconds at up to 35mph. The fabric stack weighs 21kg less than the folding hardtop. As on the 911, the foremost segment doubles up as flush-fitting cover when open.

The latest SL even gains two token rear seats, like the 911, but they are better suited to carrying a couple of soft bags than transporting toddlers, so the packaging doesn’t make sense to me. The new rear seats automatically make the boot volume shrink to 213 litres with the top down, or 240 with it up – the previous model could swallow a much more useful 485 litres with the roof up. Marketing tells us that more space behind the front seats topped the owners’ wish-list, so Mercedes duly obliged.

sl55 badge

But the SL is still about much less technical pleasures: glamour and performance. Down by the sea in Newport Beach, where roaring Lambos race whirring Teslas between sets of traffic lights on streets paved with gold, the new SL instantly fits in. It looks cool and classy; sexy even, from some angles. At a filling station, people ask questions: is the fabric roof superior to the old retractable hardtop; has the power output gone up? Yes, and yes. No one cares about electrification, fuel consumption or asking price in Southern California.

It should also be good to drive…

We’re testing the SL55 here and, although the 4.0-litre twin-turbo V8 musters a relatively unexceptional 469bhp (the 577bhp SL63 won’t be available immediately in the UK), its 516lbt ft of torque is plenty to complete the 0-62mph sprint in 3.9sec. The top speed is an equally adequate 183mph. Even so, the adaptive sports exhaust plays Godzilla vs Kong at every blip of the throttle.

Straight away I lock in my favourite settings: nine-speed transmission in manual and Sport, Dynamic Select in Race, AMG Dynamics in Pro. ESP remains active but is now on the longest available leash. Race warrants the fastest shift speed, the quickest steering response front and rear, the tautest damper setting and the most rapid throttle action.

Most of the blind corners, crests and dips are third-gear stuff, but when second is mandatory, the short gearing and the high rev level can delay the execution for a couple of awkward moments, which can leave you with rather a lot of momentum to be swiftly stashed away. Although there are nine ratios to choose from, the wet take-off clutch and the aggressively spaced three bottom gears clearly favour instant low-end acceleration kicks over mighty midrange punches.

sl front tracking

Although the Active Ride Control suspension – steel springs, adaptive dampers and hydraulically adjustable anti-roll bars – foam-fills the deepest potholes and tames the worst transverse irritations, the droning low-profile tyres mar the low- to mid-speed ride.

There’s an odd stickiness which ties the steering to the straight-ahead position, feeling like an overly-keen lane-departure system. This robotic double handshake recedes as soon as the turn-in angle increases, and it does not show at all through corners. The wider the bend, the more intriguing becomes the interplay of steering, rear-wheel steering, 4Matic+ and throttle. The combined feedback, the progressively changing torque bias and the deft brake interaction at the limit are reassuringly haptic and precisely measured.

What’s it like using that new interior?

The nicely crafted cockpit certainly looks as digitally advanced as an expensive smartphone, but unless you have a knack for touching, swiping and zooming through life, the software takes a while to reveal its full potential, which includes a highly sophisticated voice-control system. If you use it at night, the cabin ambience is vaguely reminiscent of a Manhattan cigar lounge, glowing in 15 different shades of blue, red and amber.

sl interior

At any time of day, though, your view into the dashboard is dominated by the centre stack that could be from a Tesla. But that upright XXL tablet-style main monitor looks Walmart generic, rides on an unnecessarily wide and unpadded transmission tunnel, and is crammed with a host of redundant functions most of which can alternatively be accessed via the overloaded ultra-sensitive capacitive four-spoke steering wheel. It’s all a bit much.

sl instruments

Still, in terms of refinement, road noise and suspension thump are the only persistent acoustic intrusions. The soft-top is hush quiet when closed, the wind force is tamed by the excellent drag coefficient of 0.31, and the Burmester sound system plays an unwavering first fiddle even when the V8 feels like boosting the volume of the back-up choir. The cabin also features supportive massage seats, heated door panels and armrests, standard neck warmers and extensive connectivity.

Mercedes-AMG SL: verdict

In my final moments with the SL, the owner of a triple-black Lexus LC500 asked three crucial questions: how much is a fully-loaded SL55? How does it compare? Am I tempted to buy one?

The asking price will be announced in March, so for now we must guess. As far as potent luxury cruisers go, a previous-generation Bentley GTC might perhaps be a smarter buy. As open-top sports car, any Aston, Porsche or Ferrari is the more involving drive. But the new SL is a highly accomplished new occupant of the middle ground.

Specs

Price when new: £110,000
On sale in the UK: Spring 2022
Engine: 3982cc twin-turbo V8, 469bhp @ 5500rpm, 516lb ft @ 2250rpm
Transmission: Nine-speed automatic, all-wheel drive
Performance: 3.9sec 0-62mph, 183mph, 22.2-23.9mpg, 268-288g/km
Weight / material: 1950kg
Dimensions (length/width/height in mm): 4705/1915/1359

Rivals

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  • Mercedes-AMG SL roadster (2022) review: California dreamin’
  • Mercedes-AMG SL roadster (2022) review: California dreamin’
  • Mercedes-AMG SL roadster (2022) review: California dreamin’
  • Mercedes-AMG SL roadster (2022) review: California dreamin’
  • Mercedes-AMG SL roadster (2022) review: California dreamin’
  • Mercedes-AMG SL roadster (2022) review: California dreamin’
  • Mercedes-AMG SL roadster (2022) review: California dreamin’
  • Mercedes-AMG SL roadster (2022) review: California dreamin’
  • Mercedes-AMG SL roadster (2022) review: California dreamin’
  • Mercedes-AMG SL roadster (2022) review: California dreamin’

By Georg Kacher

European editor, secrets uncoverer, futurist, first man behind any wheel

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